Welcome to Jacksonville Center for Clinical Research


Clinical trials move medicine forward. Sponsors, such as pharmaceutical companies, governments and foundations fund medical research. Patients who participate in clinical research receive many advantages including treatment at no cost, access to expertise and resources such as expensive tests. Research volunteers shape the future and can have fun while helping others and themselves.

 

As a premier clinical research organization, we have conducted more than 1,000 clinical trials over 20 years and have worldwide recognition for providing patients access to cutting edge medical research. If you have a medical issue and want a research solution, or if you are a healthy volunteer, come visit our center and learn more. One of our experts will be happy to evaluate you.


Shape the Future

Clinical research is a process that gives back. Volunteers generate information that improves future health care outcomes for everyone.                        

Find relief with new treatments

Volunteers join research to seek relief from affliction and to better understand their conditions with support from our caring team.

Programs Offer Resources or Pay

Study participants receive medical tests, services, counseling and treatment at no charge. These measures may be unavailable to the general public!


We do research in many areas


Alzheimer's Disease

Alzheimer's Research
Worried About Your Memory?

“It is only through clinical studies that we will develop and test promising new strategies for treatment, prevention, diagnosis, and ultimately a cure for Alzheimer’s disease”.(Alzheimer’s Association)
 
If you or someone you know is concerned about memory loss or Alzheimer's disease, you may be eligible for one of our clinical research studies.
We currently have multiple Alzheimer’s disease and memory studies available.
Qualified study participants will receive all study-related care and medication at no cost. Compensation may be provided for time and travel. Health insurance is not needed.
To learn more call:
904-730-0166
Or sign up below!

**If this study doesn't work for you, check out our other STUDIES **

Psoriasis

Is Plaque Psoriasis Getting Under Your Skin? 

The CLARITY study might be able to help.

Jacksonville Center for Clinical Research is conducting a clinical research study for volunteers with plaque psoriasis.

To qualify, on must:
Be 18 years of age or older

Qualified participants may receive:
Payment for time & travel-study related care at no cost.

To receive more information, call or sign up below.
(904) 730-0166



**If this study doesn't work for you, check out our other STUDIES **





View all active studies

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Watch what they have to say about their research experience!



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Phase 1 Research Joe's Experience
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Our Staff

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Andrea West

Andrea is a Clinical Research Coordinator at our University office and has been a VIP of the JCCR family for 14 years now. She obtained a bachelor’s degree in Zoology from the University of Florida and is an avid Florida Gators fan! She then went on to get her Master’s in Public Health at FIU.

Andrea loves to travel with Gerald, her husband of 17 years. “Traveling, pizza, cheese, and coffee, that’s all I need to survive” she says. Together they have traveled to Galapagos Islands, Barcelona, Paris, Costa Rica, Hawaii, Ecuador, many national parks, and British Columbia where she got unreasonably close to a mother grizzly bear and her cub. 

She has two adopted dogs from the humane society. Her favorite show is Outlander, and she hopes to read all 8 books in the series. She says “I love reading and hiking on vacation, maybe it’s time to take another trip!”

Dianne Gregory

This month we are highlighting one of our outstanding team leaders, Dianne Gregory.  As the manager of the Memorial Hospital Division of ENCORE Research Dianne has been consistently setting the bar for excellence for the past 7 years.  While Dianne currently resides in Jacksonville, FL, she grew up in the Midwest as part of a large family.  She was raised playing a plethora of outdoor sports with her sister, three brothers, and other neighborhood children.  However, Dianne truly found her passion when she started gymnastics.  She says that back handsprings and aerials kept her busy until adulthood!

In her adulthood when Dianne is not hard at work at the hospital she enjoys many hobbies such as horseback riding, camping, and cycling.  Although she is very active, Dianne also enjoys leisurely activities such as cooking and reading.  In fact, her ideal vacation would be enjoying a good book up in the mountains!  When asked about some of her most memorable vacations Dianne recalls learning to ski in 2010 (making it back in one piece we might add) and reeling in an enormous sailfish in Costa Rica!  While Dianne has surely accomplished a great deal more than most already, her bucket list includes getting a children’s book published, road tripping across the continental US and biking across Holland during the April tulip blooms.   We want to thank Dianne for her hard work and let her know we love working with such an interesting and professional team leader!

Alex Hill

Since Spring of 2013, Alex has been a wonderful addition to our research family. He has been a Research Assistant at two Encore Research sites; starting at Fleming Island Center for Clinical Research and currently at Jacksonville Center for Clinical Research (University Blvd).

Alex is a man of many hobbies, some of which include: plant breeding "Nepeta cataria citriodora" (Citrus Cat Nip), lampworking, bead making, cycling, and gardening. In fact, Alex's garden is called Eir and is registered with the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) and he has formed an LLC (Limited Liability Company) named Lyfberg which is Icelandic for "Healing Hill" which will take his gardening hobby to a professional level.

When Alex is not busy with all of those hobbies, he may be seen collecting heirloom seeds, millefiori glass (Italian for "thousand flowers"), or pokemon cards. His favorite food is a cheeseburger, even a veggie burger, and he is currently working on a recipe for a veggie burger with mostly beans, seeds, and rice.

If you noticed Alex's photo, you might have guessed that his favorite football team is the Jaguars. He also enjoys The Flash comic and TV show. His favorite video game is Halo and card game is pokemon (Gotta Catch 'Em All!) 

Lastest Blog Post:


Rogue Immune Cells, An Autoimmune Story

When patients are diagnosed with an autoimmune disorder they often have many questions. How did this happen? What is happening inside me? What treatments are available? Autoimmune diseases can be extremely complex and are the subject of much current research. The immune system’s purpose is to identify and destroy threats to the body such as viruses, bacteria or parasites. However, when a person has an autoimmune disease such as Crohn’s Disease, Lupus, Sjogren’s (show-grins) syndrome the immune system becomes unable to distinguish foreign bodies from the body’s own healthy tissue. When this happens, the immune system begins to target healthy cells causing inflammation. Almost any aspect of the immune system can malfunction causing a plethora of conditions.

One such condition is Crohn’s Disease. Crohn’s is an autoimmune disease where the immune system specifically targets the gastrointestinal tract. Crohn’s can be difficult to diagnose due to the variety of symptoms associated with the disease. The symptoms vary from person to person and by which component of the GI tract is being targeted. If a doctor suspects Crohn’s Disease, diagnosis is confirmed via an upper and/or lower endoscopy. Those living with Crohn’s disease will agree that we need to find a cure ASAP!

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus(SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease in which the immune system can cause damaging inflammation to any part of the body. Skin, joints and organs can all be affected. Flares can cause a wide variety of symptoms. Around half of those affected by lupus have what is called a butterfly rash on their face. Other common symptoms include inflammation or swelling of the joints, and fatigue.

Another inflammatory autoimmune disease is Sjogren’s Syndrome. Sjogren’s is typically identified by its most prevalent symptoms, which are dry eyes and dry mouth.   These symptoms occur because the immune system targets the glands that produce saliva.1  In the past treatment has almost entirely consisted of treating the symptoms of the disease.  However, new research is showing that Sjogren’s can lead to other complications and scientists are now working on specially devised treatments to nip the problem in the bud!

According to JCCR’s Steven Mathews, MD “the last generation of autoimmune treatments worked further down the mountain so to speak and focused on treating the avalanche of symptoms. Current treatments are looking at treating conditions higher up the mountain at the source and preventing the avalanche from occurring.” Richard Smith, RN elaborated that, “general immunosuppressants act like a hammer on the immune system, whereas the current drugs we are researching act like a fine scalpel only targeting the rogue immune cells.” Our mission at ENCORE Research Group has always been to help get cutting edge treatments approved by the FDA. We want to help deliver safe and effective treatments to everyone. This is only possible by conducting research studies on new investigational medications. If you are interested in taking part in one of our research studies call today.


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