Welcome to Jacksonville Center for Clinical Research


Clinical trials move medicine forward. Sponsors, such as pharmaceutical companies, governments and foundations fund medical research. Patients who participate in clinical research receive many advantages including treatment at no cost, access to expertise and resources such as expensive tests. Research volunteers shape the future and can have fun while helping others and themselves.

 

As a premier clinical research organization, we have conducted more than 2,500 clinical trials over 20 years and have worldwide recognition for providing patients access to cutting edge medical research. If you have a medical issue and want a research solution, or if you are a healthy volunteer, come visit our center and learn more. One of our experts will be happy to evaluate you.


Shape the Future

Clinical research is a process that gives back. Volunteers generate information that improves future health care outcomes for everyone.

Find relief with new treatments

Volunteers join research to seek relief from affliction and to better understand their conditions with support from our caring team.

Programs Offer Resources or Pay

Study participants receive medical tests, services, counseling and treatment at no charge. These measures may be unavailable to the general public!


We do research in many areas


Statin Intolerance

Statin Intolerance Research Study


We are seeking volunteers for a research study to evaluate an investigational medication for individuals unable to take medications called statins without side effects. 

You may be eligible if:

  • You are at least 18 years old
  • You are statin intolerant  

There are additional study requirements to qualify for participation.

Participants who qualify will receive study related medication and medical exams at no cost. Qualified participants will receive compensation for time and travel.  

For more information call:
(904)730-0166


**If this study doesn't work for you, check out our other STUDIES **

Memory Screening

Why Did I Walk In This Room?

How often do we find ourselves asking this frustrating question?  First, we begin to worry that there may be something going on with our memory.  Then, we wonder who can help us. This is what motivated JCCR’s CEO, Michael Koren, M.D. to begin the process of developing our Memory Program. The program was designed to offer people 50 years old or older an opportunity to be evaluated and tested in a comfortable, private setting.
The visit involves an assessment of your medical history and medications, discussing any concerns, and a verbal memory test.  If you are interested in a confidential memory screening, please call our Jacksonville office (JCCR) at 730-0166. Come in and let us put your mind at ease.
 Or sign up below!
 

**If this program doesn't work for you, check out our other STUDIES **





View all active studies

Our Volunteers Love Us


Watch what they have to say about their research experience!



Postpartum Depression Research Testimonial
Phase 1 Research Joe's Experience
Phase I Research Terry's Experience

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Our Staff

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Alex Hill

Since Spring of 2013, Alex has been a wonderful addition to our research family. He has been a Research Assistant at two Encore Research sites; starting at Fleming Island Center for Clinical Research and currently at Jacksonville Center for Clinical Research (University Blvd).

Alex is a man of many hobbies, some of which include: plant breeding "Nepeta cataria citriodora" (Citrus Cat Nip), lampworking, bead making, cycling, and gardening. In fact, Alex's garden is called Eir and is registered with the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) and he has formed an LLC (Limited Liability Company) named Lyfberg which is Icelandic for "Healing Hill" which will take his gardening hobby to a professional level.

When Alex is not busy with all of those hobbies, he may be seen collecting heirloom seeds, millefiori glass (Italian for "thousand flowers"), or pokemon cards. His favorite food is a cheeseburger, even a veggie burger, and he is currently working on a recipe for a veggie burger with mostly beans, seeds, and rice.

If you noticed Alex's photo, you might have guessed that his favorite football team is the Jaguars. He also enjoys The Flash comic and TV show. His favorite video game is Halo and card game is pokemon (Gotta Catch 'Em All!) 

Michael J. Koren, MD, FACC, FAPCR, CPI

Michael J. Koren, MD, is a practicing cardiologist and Chief Executive Officer at Jacksonville Center for Clinical Research, which conducts clinical trials at 8 locations in Florida. He received his medical degree cum laude at Harvard Medical School, and and completed his residency in internal medicine and fellowship in cardiology at NewYork Hospital/Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center/Cornell Medical Center.

Dr Koren is a fellow of the American College of Cardiology. He is also a fellow and president of the Academy of Physicians in Clinical Research and the current president of the regional chapter of the American Heart Association. As a principal investigator, Dr Koren has conducted more than 500 clinical trials on hypercholesterolemia, cardiovascular disease, and heart failure.

Dr Koren’s research has been published in peer-reviewed journals including Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Circulation, New England Journal of Medicine, and The Lancet. He is an editorial board member of Clinical Cardiology. He has lectured nationally and internationally on topics such as lipid-lowering therapy and preventive cardiology.

 

Amber Devries

Amber has been at Jacksonville Center for Clinical Research for eight years and along the way she has acquired many hats. She is the assistant site manager, a clinical research coordinator, the office party planner, and a birthday card making committee of one.

Amber graduated with a degree in biology from Jacksonville University. While there, she played on the women's soccer team, and between games she met her husband Kyle, who pitched for the JU baseball team. She still gets such a kick out of soccer that she is currently coaching a girls team for a local high school.

If you think Amber isn’t occupied enough at work and play, she also stays busy with two active sons and a baby girl!

Lastest Blog Post:


5.7 Million Adults in the US Have Heart Failure

The heart is vital (literally), so it’s important to keep it in tip-top shape! The rest of the body depends on the heart to deliver blood and oxygen to all its cells and organs. If the heart becomes damaged, it can lead to what is known as heart failure. Keeping your heart healthy not only involves proper diet and exercise, but also involves making sure conditions that can cause heart damage are properly managed.

Some conditions that can damage the heart are: 
• cardiomyopathy
• coronary artery disease
• diabetes
• heart attacks
• high blood pressure

During heart failure the heart is unable to pump blood effectively enough to meet the body’s demands. Because the heart cannot fulfill its primary duty, it will try to compensate by enlarging itself, increasing muscle mass or pumping faster. The body can also react by narrowing blood vessels and diverting blood away from less important tissues and organs. As heart failure worsens the compensations and symptoms begin to show.

Common symptoms of heart failure include: shortness of breath, fatigue, coughing, racing heart, excessive tiredness, loss of appetite, and chest pain. Risk factors for developing heart failure include diabetes, poorly controlled high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or family history of heart failure. If you think you might have symptoms of heart failure, it’s important to speak with your doctor as soon as possible.

There are about 5.7 million adults in the United States who have heart failure and it’s the leading cause of death in diabetics. In most cases, heart failure cannot be reversed once diagnosed. However, researchers are continuing to study ways to reverse heart failure as well as new and better ways to treat it. Currently, many of our ENCORE research sites have new heart failure research studies enrolling. If you or someone you know has heart failure, and are interested in participating, call our office to find out more!
 

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