Welcome to Jacksonville Center for Clinical Research


Clinical trials move medicine forward. Sponsors, such as pharmaceutical companies, governments and foundations fund medical research. Patients who participate in clinical research receive many advantages including treatment at no cost, access to expertise and resources such as expensive tests. Research volunteers shape the future and can have fun while helping others and themselves.

 

As a premier clinical research organization, we have conducted more than 2,500 clinical trials over 20 years and have worldwide recognition for providing patients access to cutting edge medical research. If you have a medical issue and want a research solution, or if you are a healthy volunteer, come visit our center and learn more. One of our experts will be happy to evaluate you.


Shape the Future

Clinical research is a process that gives back. Volunteers generate information that improves future health care outcomes for everyone.

Find relief with new treatments

Volunteers join research to seek relief from affliction and to better understand their conditions with support from our caring team.

Programs Offer Resources or Pay

Study participants receive medical tests, services, counseling and treatment at no charge. These measures may be unavailable to the general public!


We do research in many areas


Lupus

Lupus

 

Health insurance is not required to participate in our research studies.
Ask your doctor or contact our clinic for more information
(904) 730-0166

Low Testosterone

Low Testosterone


Health insurance is not required to participate in our research studies.
Ask your doctor or contact our clinic for more information
(904) 730-0166





View all active studies

Our Volunteers Love Us


Watch what they have to say about their research experience!



Postpartum Depression Research Testimonial
Phase 1 Research Joe's Experience
Phase I Research Terry's Experience

Sign Up


I'm interested in... (Scroll to select multiple)






























Our Staff

View All

Amanda Pratt

Amanda is a research coordinator at JCCR and she is also a nurse. She recently got married, congrats! Her and her husband enjoy watching Netflix together, but they love to be outdoors more than anything. Her hobbies include hunting, fishing, and going to the beach. She loves to cook pasta and eat it too! She has two dogs, a rabbit, and seven chickens.

Mitchell Rothstein, MD

Dr. Mitchell Rothstein is a Clinical Research Investigator at our Fleming Island research site and he has been with us since 2009. In February 2017, we are happy to say that Dr. Rothstein also became our new Phase 1 Medical Director at our Jacksonville University research site. We consider him an all-star at ENCORE Research Group, not only did he perform the first endobronchial stent in Jacksonville, but he also lettered in gymnastics in college. Which is probably why he handles working at two locations with ease.

In his free time, he collects animation art, especially the work of Chuck Jones, the famous Looney Tunes animator. Dr. Rothstein is a major sports fan. He loves watching mixed martial arts and is an Olympics sports addict. He is also a fan of the Jacksonville Jaguars, the New York Mets and the Jacksonville Jumbo Shrimp, our minor-league baseball team in Jacksonville.

While Dr. Rothstein has some downtime, he enjoys eating, he calls himself a ‘happy carnivore’! Some of his favorite TV shows to watch are: Fargo, Billions, Jeopardy, and Snapped. All in all, we’re glad we have Dr. Rothstein as part of our ENCORE Research team and we’re excited to see what he accomplishes with us in the years to come. 

Alex Hill

Since Spring of 2013, Alex has been a wonderful addition to our research family. He has been a Research Assistant at two Encore Research sites; starting at Fleming Island Center for Clinical Research and currently at Jacksonville Center for Clinical Research (University Blvd).

Alex is a man of many hobbies, some of which include: plant breeding "Nepeta cataria citriodora" (Citrus Cat Nip), lampworking, bead making, cycling, and gardening. In fact, Alex's garden is called Eir and is registered with the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) and he has formed an LLC (Limited Liability Company) named Lyfberg which is Icelandic for "Healing Hill" which will take his gardening hobby to a professional level.

When Alex is not busy with all of those hobbies, he may be seen collecting heirloom seeds, millefiori glass (Italian for "thousand flowers"), or pokemon cards. His favorite food is a cheeseburger, even a veggie burger, and he is currently working on a recipe for a veggie burger with mostly beans, seeds, and rice.

If you noticed Alex's photo, you might have guessed that his favorite football team is the Jaguars. He also enjoys The Flash comic and TV show. His favorite video game is Halo and card game is pokemon (Gotta Catch 'Em All!) 

Lastest Blog Post:


RSV- Respiratory Syncytial Virus

A contagious virus that can cause infections in the lungs and respiratory tract.
You may have heard of the respiratory syncytial virus, in fact most people encounter RSV more than once, sometimes within the same year. Throughout older childhood and most of adulthood you may catch RSV during the winter and experience symptoms similar to the common cold. Symptoms range from mild to severe and include nasal congestion, cough, fever, wheezing, lethargy, and difficulty breathing.

What is so concerning about RSV?
It’s known that RSV shows severe symptoms in infants. However, recent studies have seen an increasing percentage of infected older adults with severe respiratory complications requiring hospitalization and occasional fatality.

I’ve had RSV before, so my immune system knows how to respond.
As we age, we encounter a natural degradation of our immune systems. While you may have encountered RSV in the past, infection after 65 years of age could entail severe respiratory complications as the immune system loses its ability to fight the virus. Studies show that RSV causes approximately 170,000 hospitalizations and around 14,000 deaths per year among older adults.

What can I do if I get infected?
There is currently no vaccine for the prevention of RSV, and because it’s a virus, antibiotics do not work. There are some treatments available, though usually pricey and used in extreme cases if you are already hospitalized.

The good news is there are several new preventative vaccines currently being developed. As an ENCORE Research community member, you have access to our cutting-edge research trials and are the first to know about new research. If you are interested in getting involved in any of our research studies, call your local office today!
 
Written by Lana Borema


View the full blog