Welcome to Jacksonville Center for Clinical Research


Clinical trials move medicine forward. Sponsors, such as pharmaceutical companies, governments and foundations fund medical research. Patients who participate in clinical research receive many advantages including treatment at no cost, access to expertise and resources such as expensive tests. Research volunteers shape the future and can have fun while helping others and themselves.

 

As a premier clinical research organization, we have conducted more than 2,500 clinical trials over 20 years and have worldwide recognition for providing patients access to cutting edge medical research. If you have a medical issue and want a research solution, or if you are a healthy volunteer, come visit our center and learn more. One of our experts will be happy to evaluate you.


Shape the Future

Clinical research is a process that gives back. Volunteers generate information that improves future health care outcomes for everyone.

Find relief with new treatments

Volunteers join research to seek relief from affliction and to better understand their conditions with support from our caring team.

Programs Offer Resources or Pay

Study participants receive medical tests, services, counseling and treatment at no charge. These measures may be unavailable to the general public!


We do research in many areas


Lupus

Lupus
 

Health insurance is not required to participate in our research studies.
Ask your doctor or contact our clinic for more information
(904) 730-0166

Low Testosterone

Low Testosterone


Health insurance is not required to participate in our research studies.
Ask your doctor or contact our clinic for more information
(904) 730-0166





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Our Volunteers Love Us


Watch what they have to say about their research experience!



Postpartum Depression Research Testimonial
Phase 1 Research Joe's Experience
Phase I Research Terry's Experience

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Our Staff

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Sharon Smith

Sharon is the Director of Recruiter for all 8 sites in which we have over 70 enrolling studies. She is also a nurse, a diabetic educator, and a nutritional expert. She has two twin boys and now has two grandchildren! She is a competitive cyclist and landed on the podium at nationals last year. She is very active and stays fit by riding the bike and going to the gym. She has the sweetest golden lab doggo named Buckwheat who has visited the office a couple of times for hugs. Sharon eats a salad every single day and loves to cook new low carb recipes for her coworkers to try.

Alex Hill

Since Spring of 2013, Alex has been a wonderful addition to our research family. He has been a Research Assistant at two Encore Research sites; starting at Fleming Island Center for Clinical Research and currently at Jacksonville Center for Clinical Research (University Blvd).

Alex is a man of many hobbies, some of which include: plant breeding "Nepeta cataria citriodora" (Citrus Cat Nip), lampworking, bead making, cycling, and gardening. In fact, Alex's garden is called Eir and is registered with the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) and he has formed an LLC (Limited Liability Company) named Lyfberg which is Icelandic for "Healing Hill" which will take his gardening hobby to a professional level.

When Alex is not busy with all of those hobbies, he may be seen collecting heirloom seeds, millefiori glass (Italian for "thousand flowers"), or pokemon cards. His favorite food is a cheeseburger, even a veggie burger, and he is currently working on a recipe for a veggie burger with mostly beans, seeds, and rice.

If you noticed Alex's photo, you might have guessed that his favorite football team is the Jaguars. He also enjoys The Flash comic and TV show. His favorite video game is Halo and card game is pokemon (Gotta Catch 'Em All!) 

Joyce Williams

If you have ever stepped foot into the Jacksonville Center for Clinical Research building on University Blvd. then you have probably met Joyce M. Williams. Joyce has been the Director of First Impressions here since March 2, 1998, and she became the first African American shareholder at JCCR in 2003.

Joyce is an ordained minister! She attended Jacksonville Theological Seminary and graduated in May 2007 with an Associates Degree in Religious Arts of Biblical Studies. She is very involved in her church; she is the Lead Vocalist, #1 Choir Director, Church Secretary, President of the Missionary Board, and Deaconess.

If all of this doesn't keep Joyce busy enough, she also collects thimbles - she has over one hundred! She also loves to color large coloring pads and books. Some of Joyce's favorite foods are spaghetti, fried chicken and seafood. If you have met Joyce, you can agree that she has a great love for her job and all the people that she meets. 

Lastest Blog Post:


Why Are English Sailors Called Limeys?

On a sailing ship in 1747, twelve sailors who had begun the voyage feeling fine were overcome with fatigue.  Their gums were swollen and sore, making it difficult to eat.  Their teeth were falling out.  Their legs were swollen and purple from bruising.  

Dr. James Lind was a passenger on that ship, and he set out to find the cause.  He set up what may have been the first clinical nutrition experiment.  He decided on six groups of treatments, 2 sailors in each group: 

1. drank one quart of cider a day
2. gargled with sulfuric acid
3. had two spoonfuls of vinegar, 3 times a day
4. drank ½ pint seawater a day
5. drank barley water
6. ate two oranges and 1 lemon a day

Within six days, the sailors who ate the oranges and lemon felt better, and were able to work again.  The other sailors in the experiment felt worse.  The ill sailors were suffering from a lack of vitamin C, now known as Scurvy. They had plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables when they first set out on the voyage.  But fresh foods ran out on the long voyage, and they suffered symptoms from this lack. After this finding, sailors often brought lime juice aboard ship because it could be stored longer. This is how sailors earned the nickname “limey”.

1747 was well before the requirement of informed consent of the patient, detailed eligibility criteria, protocols and regulations, which are a foundation of today’s clinical research.  Nevertheless, it is an interesting example of a method of discovering the best treatment for a disabling condition.  

Scientific minds are still seeking solutions for medical problems.  Modern clinical research is strictly regulated for the safety and well-being of the research volunteer.  Great progress has been made in medical science over the last decades.  This progress could not happen without dedicated volunteers. Participation in clinical trials can be a rewarding endeavor for both investigators and volunteers alike.

Written by Julia Baker, RN, CCRC

Resources:  
https://askabiologist.asu.edu
https://www.umass.edu/nibble/infofile/limey.html
 
 

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