Welcome to Jacksonville Center for Clinical Research


Clinical trials move medicine forward. Sponsors, such as pharmaceutical companies, governments and foundations fund medical research. Patients who participate in clinical research receive many advantages including treatment at no cost, access to expertise and resources such as expensive tests. Research volunteers shape the future and can have fun while helping others and themselves.

 

As a premier clinical research organization, we have conducted more than 1,000 clinical trials over 20 years and have worldwide recognition for providing patients access to cutting edge medical research. If you have a medical issue and want a research solution, or if you are a healthy volunteer, come visit our center and learn more. One of our experts will be happy to evaluate you.


Shape the Future

Clinical research is a process that gives back. Volunteers generate information that improves future health care outcomes for everyone.

Find relief with new treatments

Volunteers join research to seek relief from affliction and to better understand their conditions with support from our caring team.

Programs Offer Resources or Pay

Study participants receive medical tests, services, counseling and treatment at no charge. These measures may be unavailable to the general public!


We do research in many areas


Statin Intolerance

Statin Intolerance Research Study


We are seeking volunteers for a research study to evaluate an investigational medication for individuals unable to take medications called statins without side effects. 

You may be eligible if:

  • You are at least 18 years old
  • You are statin intolerant  

There are additional study requirements to qualify for participation.

Participants who qualify will receive study related medication and medical exams at no cost. Qualified participants will receive compensation for time and travel.  

For more information call:
(904)730-0166


**If this study doesn't work for you, check out our other STUDIES **

Memory Screening

Why Did I Walk In This Room?

How often do we find ourselves asking this frustrating question?  First, we begin to worry that there may be something going on with our memory.  Then, we wonder who can help us. This is what motivated JCCR’s CEO, Michael Koren, M.D. to begin the process of developing our Memory Program. The program was designed to offer people 50 years old or older an opportunity to be evaluated and tested in a comfortable, private setting.
The visit involves an assessment of your medical history and medications, discussing any concerns, and a verbal memory test.  If you are interested in a confidential memory screening, please call our Jacksonville office (JCCR) at 730-0166. Come in and let us put your mind at ease.
 Or sign up below!
 

**If this program doesn't work for you, check out our other STUDIES **





View all active studies

Our Volunteers Love Us


Watch what they have to say about their research experience!



Postpartum Depression Research Testimonial
Phase 1 Research Joe's Experience
Phase I Research Terry's Experience

Sign Up


I'm interested in... (Scroll to select multiple)























Our Staff

View All

Alpa Patel, MD

Since 2008, Dr. Alpa Patel has been a team member at the Jacksonville Center for Clinical Research. Aside from her duties as a Clinical Investigator, she also works full time at Family Care Partners of Arlington.

Dr. Patel was born in London, but has called Florida her home for more than 20 years. She earned her Medical Degree from University of Florida and then she trained in Internal Medicine at Shands Hospital.  She is Board certified in Internal Medicine.

Although Dr. Patel is kept extremely busy by her medical practice and duties as a Clinical Investigator, she always makes time to raise awareness about clinical trials. Dr. Patel often hosts educational sessions at the clinic to shed light on what goes on in clinical trials and discuss new medications. However, her philanthropy knows no bounds as she has also been active in many community volunteer efforts including Habitat for Humanity, free health clinics and AIDS awareness education. In her downtime, she enjoys traveling, watching movies and sports, and spending time with her family.

Michael J. Koren, MD, FACC, FAPCR, CPI

Michael J. Koren, MD, is a practicing cardiologist and Chief Executive Officer at Jacksonville Center for Clinical Research, which conducts clinical trials at 8 locations in Florida. He received his medical degree cum laude at Harvard Medical School, and and completed his residency in internal medicine and fellowship in cardiology at NewYork Hospital/Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center/Cornell Medical Center.

Dr Koren is a fellow of the American College of Cardiology. He is also a fellow and president of the Academy of Physicians in Clinical Research and the current president of the regional chapter of the American Heart Association. As a principal investigator, Dr Koren has conducted more than 500 clinical trials on hypercholesterolemia, cardiovascular disease, and heart failure.

Dr Koren’s research has been published in peer-reviewed journals including Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Circulation, New England Journal of Medicine, and The Lancet. He is an editorial board member of Clinical Cardiology. He has lectured nationally and internationally on topics such as lipid-lowering therapy and preventive cardiology.

 

Lateshia Taylor

Lateshia Taylor is a research assistant at the JCCR university office and has been a member of our research family for ten years. She loves to travel and try new outdoor adventures with her son, Shumbae. And when she says adventures, she’s talking zip-lining, camping and river-rafting. Her favorite sport is football and she is a Jaguars fan, but as the mom of a busy six-year-old, she also appreciates quiet time reading and the occasional pampering pedicure or massage. 

While she tells us that she doesn’t really have a favorite food, she does warn us that she will NOT eat peas or beans. She hates peas and beans. 

Lateshia admits that her guilty pleasure is messy reality TV, but since she just moved into a new house, we doubt that she’ll have much time to indulge in that for a while. She will be occupied with decorating and arranging her new space – making a home sweet home.

Congratulations on your new adventure Lateshia!

Lastest Blog Post:


NO SLEEP FOR YOU!

Sleep is essential for the body to repair and restore itself. In fact, sleep is so important that humans spend approximately 30% of their lives sleeping. However, since the beginning of recorded time and undoubtedly before that, some people have struggled to sleep. Fortunately, over the last 50 years our understanding of how to improve and correct the body’s sleep systems has advanced tremendously. This research has led to new understanding of how people sleep and why about 30% of the US population struggles with sleep disorders such as insomnia.

Insomnia is defined as dissatisfaction with sleep quantity or quality associated with difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep, even when there is adequate sleep opportunity (7-8 hours). This can cause significant social or functional distress and impairment. The most common sleep disorder in the US is Insufficient Sleep Syndrome, in which sleep deprivation occurs from an inadequate amount of sleep. Insufficient Sleep Syndrome is voluntary, but unintentional, unlike insomnia. 1 A recent poll of US adults suggests an average sleep time of just over 6 hours which is 2 hours less than we were sleeping 100 years ago, however, our sleep need has remained constant.

In order to achieve quality sleep, many insomniacs often self-prescribe antihistamines and alcohol. These treatments often have negative short and long-term outcomes. The first recommended treatment is Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), but this involves a trained therapist as well as a significant time commitment. These aspects combined with the fact that it is not well reimbursed by insurance can make it prohibitive for many individuals. A more cost-efficient alternative can be self-directed computer-based programs. Traditional pharmaceutical sleep products (hypnotics) have focused on depressing the central nervous system directly, but these medications have limitations due to adverse effects such as hangover, amnesia, abuse liability and dependence.  

To end on a positive note, new research is focusing on some different ways to treat insomnia. We are excited to be involved at two of our North Florida ENCORE Research Group offices. If you are interested in getting involved in any of our research studies, call your local office today!

 

The offices that will be conducting insomnia research are:

Fleming Island Center for Clinical Research

Jacksonville Center for Clinical Research

  

1. http://www.sleepeducation.org/sleep-disorders-by-category/hypersomnias/insufficient-sleep-syndrome

 Check our active studies page for an up to date list of current enrolling research studies.


View the full blog