Welcome to Jacksonville Center for Clinical Research


Clinical trials move medicine forward. Sponsors, such as pharmaceutical companies, governments and foundations fund medical research. Patients who participate in clinical research receive many advantages including treatment at no cost, access to expertise and resources such as expensive tests. Research volunteers shape the future and can have fun while helping others and themselves.

 

As a premier clinical research organization, we have conducted more than 2,500 clinical trials over 20 years and have worldwide recognition for providing patients access to cutting edge medical research. If you have a medical issue and want a research solution, or if you are a healthy volunteer, come visit our center and learn more. One of our experts will be happy to evaluate you.


Shape the Future

Clinical research is a process that gives back. Volunteers generate information that improves future health care outcomes for everyone.

Find relief with new treatments

Volunteers join research to seek relief from affliction and to better understand their conditions with support from our caring team.

Programs Offer Resources or Pay

Study participants receive medical tests, services, counseling and treatment at no charge. These measures may be unavailable to the general public!


We do research in many areas


Low Testosterone

Low Testosterone


Health insurance is not required to participate in our research studies.
Ask your doctor or contact our clinic for more information
(904) 730-0166

Alzheimer's Disease

Alzheimer's Research


Health insurance is not required to participate in our research studies.
Ask your doctor or contact our clinic for more information
(904) 730-0166
 





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Our Volunteers Love Us


Watch what they have to say about their research experience!



Postpartum Depression Research Testimonial
Phase 1 Research Joe's Experience
Phase I Research Terry's Experience

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Our Staff

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Emery Noles

Emery Noles is the VP of Networking and has been with ENCORE Research Group since 2002. She loves to spend time with her husband, her two children and golden retriever; especially while at the beach. During her trips to the beach, she loves to look for shark’s teeth to add to her collection, “once I get started looking for shark’s teeth, I can’t stop…it’s addicting!” Emery also collects wine corks, and for bottles on special occasions, she will write the event and date on the cork. 

Some of Emery’s other favorite things involve: reading, gardening and running. She also loves to watch Modern Family “I can relate to Claire on all accounts!”. When it comes to sports, her favorite teams are East Carolina Pirates and the Florida Gators. During the games you might find one of Emery’s favorite foods pizza or tacos on her dinner table, which are also foods the whole family loves!  

Andrea West

Andrea is a Clinical Research Coordinator at our University office and has been a VIP of the JCCR family for 17 years now (since 2002). She obtained a bachelor’s degree in Zoology from the University of Florida and is an avid Florida Gators fan! She then went on to get her Master’s in Public Health at FIU.

Andrea loves to travel with Gerald, her husband of 20 years. “Traveling, pizza, cheese, and coffee, that’s all I need to survive” she says. Together they have traveled to Galapagos Islands, Barcelona, Paris, Costa Rica, Hawaii, Ecuador, many national parks, and British Columbia where she got unreasonably close to a mother grizzly bear and her cub. 

She has two adopted dogs from the humane society. Her favorite show is Outlander, and she hopes to read all 8 books in the series. She says “I love reading and hiking on vacation, maybe it’s time to take another trip!”

Alpa Patel, MD

Since 2008, Dr. Alpa Patel has been a team member at the Jacksonville Center for Clinical Research. Aside from her duties as a Clinical Investigator, she also works full time at Millennium Physician Group.

Dr. Patel was born in London, but has called Florida her home for more than 20 years. She earned her Medical Degree from University of Florida and then she trained in Internal Medicine at Shands Hospital.  She is Board certified in Internal Medicine.

Although Dr. Patel is kept extremely busy by her medical practice and duties as a Clinical Investigator, she always makes time to raise awareness about clinical trials. Dr. Patel often hosts educational sessions at the clinic to shed light on what goes on in clinical trials and discuss new medications. However, her philanthropy knows no bounds as she has also been active in many community volunteer efforts including Habitat for Humanity, free health clinics and AIDS awareness education. In her downtime, she enjoys traveling, watching movies and sports, and spending time with her family.

Lastest Blog Post:


Hearts: Male Vs. Female

The old saying goes: Men are from Mars and Women are from Venus. This exaggeration is- well… an exaggeration, but there are some differences between male and female heart health that causes an inkling of truth to shine out through the expression. The most common kind of heart disease, among both men and women, is coronary artery disease. Coronary artery disease is caused when cholesterol plaque is built up inside the arteries, and if left untreated coronary artery disease can obstruct blood flow to the heart muscle and lead to a heart attack. 

When experiencing a heart attack, the individual will usually experience chest pain, shortness of breath, and pain in their left arm, but these symptoms are not universal. Remember when we were talking about the differences between men and women? Women are more likely to experience uncommon heart attack symptoms than men are! These symptoms can include indigestion, pain in both arms, unusual fatigue and abdominal discomfort. Physicians are still uncertain why women are more likely to experience unusual symptoms. There are some theories about hormonal changes and the difference in valve and vessel sizes, but for the most part it is still unknown. 

Lowering your risk of a heart attack, however, is not a mystery. Research shows staying active, eating healthy, and monitoring your blood pressure and cholesterol levels regularly leads to decreased cardiovascular risk.  Research also shows that individuals involved in clinical research have better health care outcomes than those who are not.
 
We are currently enrolling in studies that may help you lower important factors like elevated triglycerides and cholesterol which may help lower your risk of cardiovascular events. 


References:

https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/heart_vascular_institute/centers_excellence/womens_cardiovascular_health_center/patient_information/health_topics/menopause_cardiovascular_system.html

https://www.lahey.org/article/differences-between-mens-and-womens-hearts/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3018605/

https://www.clinicaltrials.gov


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